Tuesday, 31 May 2011

Mercedes SLS AMG by MEC Design - photo album

Source: http://feeds.worldcarfans.com/~r/worldcarfans/Jxfz/~3/ahCfc58r2XM/mercedes-sls-amg-by-mec-design

Allen Berg Georges Berger Gerhard Berger Eric Bernard Enrique Bernoldi Enrico Bertaggia

Power play over new F1 rules

A major revolution in Formula 1 engine and car design scheduled for the 2013 season is under threat.

The plan is to replace the current 2.4-litre V8 engines with 1.6-litre four-cylinder turbos fitted with extensive environmental technology and for the cars to be made more efficient.

The idea is to help popularise sustainable technologies, which are already being used in road cars, and therefore to insulate F1 from any accusations that it is profligate with resources. As a result, it is hoped F1 will become more attractive to other car companies.

Except that the changes, which we have discussed extensively on this blog over the last year or so, might not happen - at least not in two years' time.

They are already formally part of the regulations for 2013. But F1 commercial boss Bernie Ecclestone has recently given voice to a view within the sport that the changes should either be postponed or abandoned. And he has a powerful ally in the shape of Ferrari.

Publicly, Ecclestone's objections to the new engine focus on three fundamental areas:

  • Spectacle - he believes the new engines will sound flatter, quieter and less dramatic than the current ones, reducing an important part of the sport's appeal
  • Money - he is worried the sport cannot afford the cost of developing the engines, which will be between 40-100 million Euros (�36-89m) depending on which estimate you believe.
  • Ferrari - the Italian legend runs F1's most famous and therefore most important team and its views need to be taken seriously. It is opposed to the new engine formula because it feels it has no synergy with its road cars and because it feels there are cheaper and more effective ways of making F1 more fuel-efficient.

Ferrari is as aware of the need to market energy-efficient technologies as anyone. It is embracing environmental technology on its road cars - it has, for example, released a version of its California GT car with a version of the stop-start systems that are becoming increasingly common in road cars, and it has developed a hybrid version of its monster 599 supercar.

It has objected specifically to the size of the engine - why restrict it to four cylinders, president Luca di Montezemolo has asked, branding the current rule "pathetic"?

Felipe Massa's Ferrari suffers an engine problem during winter testing

Will Ferrari's opposition mean the 2013 engine changes go up in smoke? Photo: Getty

Ferrari is also pushing to ensure the 2013 chassis rules reflect its belief that the importance of aerodynamics is out of all proportion in F1. It wants them to be reined in so other aspects such as the mechanical and suspension set-up have more relevance, as is the case with road cars

But it is not just Ecclestone and Ferrari. Although the teams approved these rules, which they worked on with Jean Todt, president of governing body the FIA, other team principals have reservations, too.

One told me the arguments put forward for introducing the new engines do not stand up, in his view.

One of those arguments was that F1's use of increasingly outmoded engine technology was a barrier not only to attracting new sponsors of the kind that want to be associated with sustainability, but also to new car manufacturers entering the sport.

The engine change was proposed after German giant Volkswagen Audi indicated that it could be interested in F1 if the engine formula mirrored the future direction of road cars.

Doubters point out that not only have no new sponsors obviously been attracted, but that VW has since decided not to enter F1 for the foreseeable future.

As a result, the critics say, all the new rules will do is increase the cost for the existing participants. That is a major concern at a time when, according to one team boss, "there are a few teams on the breadline".

Equally, it seems that, among the current engine manufacturers, not only Ferrari is getting cold feet.

Mercedes would prefer not to change the rules; it is concerned about the expense and questions whether it is necessary, although I understand it has told fellow stakeholders it will go along with what everyone else agrees. Independent Cosworth is said to be not that keen either, although it told BBC Sport it was "neutral" and dismissed suggestions that it could not afford to build the engines. Only Renault will publicly say it is in favour.

The environmental argument is getting a bit of kicking, too.

The emissions created by an entire season of F1 races are less than those produced by one Boeing 747 flying to Japan. Road car manufacturers are already developing these engines. So why, some say, is F1 bothering? F1, the argument goes, should be about escapism, and the sport should be focusing on delivering more races like the recent thrilling Chinese Grand Prix.

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. Visit BBC Webwise for full instructions. If you're reading via RSS, you'll need to visit the blog to access this content.


So why not abandon or postpone the plan? Well, it is not as simple as that.

Renault's backing is rooted in marketing - it does not, unlike Mercedes and Ferrari, run its own F1 team and, unlike Cosworth, racing engines are not its core business.

Renault's F1 managing director Jean-Francois Caubet says the fact the sport is changing to a new more sustainable engine formula is one of three reasons for staying involved.

"The proposed rules are road-relevant and completely in line with Renault's road car strategy," he says. "We have already started design concepts on the 2013 engine, as this dovetails with our plans in road cars."

The French company plans for such engines - let's call them small capacity turbo-hybrid - to make up at least 70% of its road-car portfolio by 2015. It accepts the new F1 rules will cost money, but believes that is a price worth paying.

Caubet says Renault's presence in F1 is not "dependent on any future engine regulations", but does add the company is "very supportive of any regulations that make F1 more relevant to the overall aims of the Renault group".

Equally, proponents of the new engines point out that it is unfair to say no new manufacturers or sponsors have come in as a result of the new rules.

The change is still two years away, so how is it possible to know whether new sponsors will be attracted?

And just because no new car manufacturers have entered yet does not mean they will not. VW got cold feet, it is believed, because F1 took so long to agree the rules. Either way, the only sure thing is that new companies will not enter F1 if the engine rules stay the same.

As for Ecclestone, cynics in F1 - and there are many - believe his objections are at least as much about a couple of other issues he has not mentioned publicly.

One is that he and Todt simply do not get along. As someone who knows Ecclestone well said: "He's against it because Todt is for it."

FIA president Jean Todt and F1 commercial boss Bernie Ecclestone

Todt and Ecclestone do not see eye to eye on the new rules. Photo: Getty

There is also the fact that the sport's stakeholders are embarking on what will be tough and protracted negotiations aimed at extending the Concorde Agreement, the document that binds together the teams, the FIA and the commercial rights holders.

Ecclestone - representing the commercial rights holders, CVC - knows that both the teams and the FIA are unhappy with their financial arrangements and are asking for an improvement.

The teams are a potentially major headache for him. Currently, they get 47% of F1's revenues divided between them - and they are angling for as much as 80%. The teams are united under the umbrella group Fota, and have resisted all attempts to break them up over the last few years. Some believe Ecclestone sees the argument over engines as a chance to annex Ferrari and split Fota.

Of Ecclestone's public concerns, the least plausible is over the sound of the engines.

F1 used 1.5-litre turbo engines - and a formula restricting fuel usage, which is also part of the new rules - in the mid-1980s. Far from driving fans away, this is looked back on as one of the most exciting eras in the sport's history.

Insiders point out that only a handful of die-hard aficionados care about the sound of the engines - and that these people will watch anyway. The wider TV audience - which is of far more critical importance to the financial health of the sport - would probably not even notice the difference.

Equally, even if the sound of the engines is a concern, this can be addressed at least to some degree by tuning the exhaust.

As for affordability, the argument that the smaller teams will not be able to afford the new engines is easy to resolve - the manufacturers simply have to agree not to pass on the cost of development, and to keep the sale price of the engines the same as it is now.

In such situations, F1 usually finds a compromise - although that would mean Todt being seen to publicly back down, which is far from an easy sell when this is the first big change in F1 rules under his presidency.

But what would the compromise be?

An influential figure has recently proposed that the new rules could be postponed for a year until 2014. This would coincide with the fact that Pirelli's contract as tyre supplier runs out at the end of 2013 and allow the planned change of wheel-rim diameter from 13 to 15 inches to coincide with the new chassis rules, on which the wheel change has a significant impact.

Perhaps the current engines could be retained but with their Kers systems increased in power, and used to promote efficiency - such as running the cars purely on electric power in the pit lane. Perhaps a fuel restriction - part of the new rules anyway - could be introduced but not the new engines. Or a combination of some or all of the above.

The problem is that while all these arguments are going on, 2013 is getting ever closer, and engines have a long lead time. Manufacturers have already started work on the new designs, because that's what the rules say will be required.

Insiders say that, realistically, any decision will have to be made by the end of the summer. Any longer than that, and any objections will be academic - enough money will have been spent on the new engines that they might as well be adopted.

So if Ecclestone and Ferrari are going to spike the 2013 engine rules, they are going to have to get on with it.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/andrewbenson/2011/04/power_play_over_new_f1_rules.html

Jean Alesi Jaime Alguersuari Philippe Alliot Cliff Allison Fernando Alonso Giovanna Amati

INDYCAR: Have You Bought A Ride Lately?

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/nofenders/zbjv/~3/UT64EAZlf7A/indycar-have-you-bought-ride-lately.html

Allen Berg Georges Berger Gerhard Berger Eric Bernard Enrique Bernoldi Enrico Bertaggia

INDY 500: the DannaWho? Quotient

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/nofenders/zbjv/~3/2HSRHOqw3qc/indy-500-dannawho-quotient.html

Jim Clark† Kevin Cogan Peter Collins Bernard Collomb Alberto Colombo Erik Comas

Hamilton: I would rather quit F1 than change my style

insists he would rather quit than change his racing style after an adventurous Grand Prix that saw the 2008 World Champion penalised twice for causing two avoidable racing incidents.

Hamilton went on to criticise the race stewards, calling it a ?frickin joke? ...

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Formula1Fancast/~3/4NRNI5lV51Q/hamilton-i-would-rather-quit-f1-than-change-my-style

Luca Badoer Giancarlo Baghetti Julian Bailey Mauro Baldi Bobby Ball Marcel Balsa

INDY LIGHTS: 2011 Primer...

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/nofenders/zbjv/~3/c2tkBlN-4Yo/indy-lights-2011-primer.html

Ray Crawford Alberto Crespo Antonio Creus Larry Crockett Tony Crook Art Cross

Williams: first points of 2011 ?bittersweet? | 2011 Monaco Grand Prix

Williams technical director Sam Michael says the team's first points of 2011 were "bittersweet".

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/f1fanatic/~3/zsWNB1hBcPo/

Christijan Albers Michele Alboreto Jean Alesi Jaime Alguersuari Philippe Alliot Cliff Allison

McMurray gets to the front, blows up

Source: http://www.newsobserver.com/2011/05/29/1236105/mcmurray-loses-lead-then-an-engine.html

Piero Carini Duane Carter Eugenio Castellotti Johnny Cecotto Andrea de Cesaris Francois Cevert

Need input(NEW DIRECTION AND TUTORIAL!)

Was going for a kinda mableized look. Its tamita black dabbed with met. purple and aqua with a transparent purple/green colorshift over it. just needs clear at this point but i'm trying to decide if i should proceed with the build. Look ok to you guys?

Hosted on Fotki

Source: http://cs.scaleautomag.com/SCACS/forums/thread/961254.aspx

Tony Crook Art Cross Geoff Crossley Chuck Daigh Yannick Dalmas Derek Daly

Why the Monaco GP still packs a punch

Once a year Formula 1 absolutely lives up to its billing as the most glamorous sport in the world and that time comes at the Monaco Grand Prix.

On Friday morning, I had to gingerly step aboard a tender and then climb a rope ladder dangling from the side of a yacht to interview Renault's Nick Heidfeld on deck. Yes, this really could only happen in Monaco.

Without a doubt, the glamour and prestige of the tiny principality, where residents are required to have a significant sum in the bank, inflates F1's wow factor.

"I love it here, it is fantastic," crooned Lewis Hamilton, a Monaco race-winner in 2008 for McLaren. "Wow, this is such a beautiful place to be."

A panoramic view of the course

Monaco's street circuit provides a unique thrill for spectators (Getty)

After a muted showing in recent years, the harbour is once again crammed with multi-million pound yachts. Force India owner Vijay Mallya held a Bollywood-themed party on the Indian Empress while the imposing Force Blue made its return with flamboyant owner and former Renault boss Flavio Briatore on board.

Red Bull and Toro Rosso have also taken to water in their floating motorhome - complete with its own swimming pool - while Ferrari have gone one better by putting up their personnel on a yacht.

With such exotic playthings at hand it's hardly surprising the guest list includes Hollywood A-listers Scarlett Johansson and Leonardo di Caprio.

But for all the privilege and status on show, the Monaco Grand Prix also provides unrivalled access for fans.

The more affluent spectator can fork out up to �3,800 for Sunday's race but the cheapest seat is �65 and offers amazing trackside views and a party atmosphere from the Rochers hill along the side of the royal palace.

It's also the only paddock where fans can walk along the waterfront and peer into the teams' inner sanctums before posing for photos with their heroes as they emerge from the motorhomes.

And when the racing is over and dusk falls, the party begins on the track as fans sip a biere or two at the Rascasse bar.

Girls at a promotional event

Glitzy promotional events are par for the course in Monaco (Getty)

When Stirling Moss raced here during the Sixties he developed a habit of waving at female fans sunning themselves along the harbour.

Moss said he even used it as a ploy in the 1961 grand prix when he was under pressure from Richie Ginther's chasing Ferrari. Moss took his hand off the wheel to salute a girl and prove he wasn't feeling under pressure.

But can McLaren driver Jenson Button, a Monaco playboy turned triathlete, still have a sneaky glimpse at an average speed of 100mph? "No," he answered sternly.

Whatever you think of Monaco's champagne and celebrity, the yachts and those who pose upon them, Button is spot on - none of it detracts from the racing through the streets.

The miniature land, stacked on a rocky lip of land between France's Mont Angel mountain and the Mediterranean, is just made for the fastest cars in the world to hurtle around.

First comes the noise, the hum hidden among the biscuit-coloured buildings that gathers to a roar as the cars flash past.

Watching the cars fly by the grand Casino, weave nose-to-tail round the hairpin, thunder through the tunnel and then out again in a blink of light past the water and back round to Rascasse is mesmerising, and often nail-biting.

The late Ayrton Senna, who won in Monaco a record six times, spoke of an out of body experience as he glided between the barriers and round the twisting curves.

Driving precision is everything here and there is virtually no let-up, no straights to clear the head over 78 laps.

Two-time Monaco winner turned BBC pundit David Coulthard commented: "For me there's no better challenge for the driver than Monte Carlo and no more glamorous grand prix. For me it's still a thrill."

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/sarahholt/2011/05/once_a_year_formula_1.html

Thierry Boutsen Johnny Boyd David Brabham Gary Brabham Jack Brabham† Bill Brack

Commentary: Indy fuel game costs Patrick

Source: http://www.newsobserver.com/2011/05/30/1236092/indy-fuel-game-costs-patrick.html

Gary Brabham Jack Brabham† Bill Brack Ernesto Brambilla Vittorio Brambilla Toni Branca

Tron Car by Timur Bozca


If you are a fan of the Tron Legacy movie that aired last year you should know that it is full with dreaming of the wondrous vehicles. And is no wonder that people would try designing vehicles similar to those in the movie. For example, Timur Bozca, a young and enthusiastic designer has developed the "Tron Car" - a vehicle that seems suitable for any ride on both Earth or Grid.

His car is a combination of the elements found in the movie: it combines a glossy black body with blue neon lines on either side of the car. The car sits on 20" wheels that are also highlighted by blue neon lines.

The concept’s dimension are 4000 x 2000 x 1550 mm and is comes from the future it is an electronic vehicle. The car runs on four electronic Hub Motors that take their power from both battery and power units for charging and storing energy.

And you will be happy to know that this is a family car: it offers interior room for four people.

Tron Car by Timur Bozca originally appeared on topspeed.com on Monday, 30 May 2011 13:00 EST.

read more




Source: http://www.topspeed.com/cars/car-news/tron-car-by-timur-bozca-ar110435.html

Jimmy Daywalt JeanDenis Deletraz Patrick Depailler Pedro Diniz Duke Dinsmore Frank Dochnal

Monday, 30 May 2011

McLaren says Hamilton apologised to FIA

McLaren says that Lewis Hamilton has apologised to the FIA Stewards for his controversial remarks after the Monaco GP. The move will have gone some way to heading off any future action for bringing the sport into disrepute. Team principal … Continue reading

Source: http://adamcooperf1.com/2011/05/29/whitmarsh-says-hamilton-aplogised-to-fia/

Luki Botha JeanChristophe Boullion Sebastien Bourdais Thierry Boutsen Johnny Boyd David Brabham

The Other Chaves: Pedro ? NOT Gabby...

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/nofenders/zbjv/~3/eIXujPHkPxk/other-chaves-pedro-not-gabby.html

Clemar Bucci Ronnie Bucknum Ivor Bueb Sebastien Buemi Luiz Bueno Ian Burgess

Rookie's slip gives Wheldon an Indy 500 victory

Source: http://www.newsobserver.com/2011/05/30/1236079/crash-in-final-turn-costs-rookie.html

Frank Armi Chuck Arnold Rene Arnoux Peter Arundell Alberto Ascari Peter Ashdown

Infiniti FX 30dS tuned by AHG Sports

German tuner ups the Infiniti FX 30dS appeal quotient to make it a Porsche Cayenne Diesel competitor.

Source: http://feeds.worldcarfans.com/~r/worldcarfans/Jxfz/~3/JkqgH_EJink/infiniti-fx-30ds-tuned-by-ahg-sports

Pablo Birger Art Bisch Harry Blanchard Michael Bleekemolen Alex Blignaut Trevor Blokdyk

Perez ? conscious, talking

Sergio Perez is at the hospital in Monaco following his accident at Monaco. The Sauber team says that he is “conscious, talking and undergoing tests”.

Source: http://joesaward.wordpress.com/2011/05/28/perez-conscious-talking/

JeanDenis Deletraz Patrick Depailler Pedro Diniz Duke Dinsmore Frank Dochnal Jose Dolhem

Herky Jerky Shuffle?

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/nofenders/zbjv/~3/4k2JuFURe_k/herky-jerky-shuffle.html

Michael Andretti Keith Andrews Elio de Angelis Marco Apicella Mário de Araújo Cabral Frank Armi

Session will restart at 15.35

Source: http://joesaward.wordpress.com/2011/05/28/session-will-restart-at-15-35/

Mario Andretti Michael Andretti Keith Andrews Elio de Angelis Marco Apicella Mário de Araújo Cabral

Power play over new F1 rules

A major revolution in Formula 1 engine and car design scheduled for the 2013 season is under threat.

The plan is to replace the current 2.4-litre V8 engines with 1.6-litre four-cylinder turbos fitted with extensive environmental technology and for the cars to be made more efficient.

The idea is to help popularise sustainable technologies, which are already being used in road cars, and therefore to insulate F1 from any accusations that it is profligate with resources. As a result, it is hoped F1 will become more attractive to other car companies.

Except that the changes, which we have discussed extensively on this blog over the last year or so, might not happen - at least not in two years' time.

They are already formally part of the regulations for 2013. But F1 commercial boss Bernie Ecclestone has recently given voice to a view within the sport that the changes should either be postponed or abandoned. And he has a powerful ally in the shape of Ferrari.

Publicly, Ecclestone's objections to the new engine focus on three fundamental areas:

  • Spectacle - he believes the new engines will sound flatter, quieter and less dramatic than the current ones, reducing an important part of the sport's appeal
  • Money - he is worried the sport cannot afford the cost of developing the engines, which will be between 40-100 million Euros (�36-89m) depending on which estimate you believe.
  • Ferrari - the Italian legend runs F1's most famous and therefore most important team and its views need to be taken seriously. It is opposed to the new engine formula because it feels it has no synergy with its road cars and because it feels there are cheaper and more effective ways of making F1 more fuel-efficient.

Ferrari is as aware of the need to market energy-efficient technologies as anyone. It is embracing environmental technology on its road cars - it has, for example, released a version of its California GT car with a version of the stop-start systems that are becoming increasingly common in road cars, and it has developed a hybrid version of its monster 599 supercar.

It has objected specifically to the size of the engine - why restrict it to four cylinders, president Luca di Montezemolo has asked, branding the current rule "pathetic"?

Felipe Massa's Ferrari suffers an engine problem during winter testing

Will Ferrari's opposition mean the 2013 engine changes go up in smoke? Photo: Getty

Ferrari is also pushing to ensure the 2013 chassis rules reflect its belief that the importance of aerodynamics is out of all proportion in F1. It wants them to be reined in so other aspects such as the mechanical and suspension set-up have more relevance, as is the case with road cars

But it is not just Ecclestone and Ferrari. Although the teams approved these rules, which they worked on with Jean Todt, president of governing body the FIA, other team principals have reservations, too.

One told me the arguments put forward for introducing the new engines do not stand up, in his view.

One of those arguments was that F1's use of increasingly outmoded engine technology was a barrier not only to attracting new sponsors of the kind that want to be associated with sustainability, but also to new car manufacturers entering the sport.

The engine change was proposed after German giant Volkswagen Audi indicated that it could be interested in F1 if the engine formula mirrored the future direction of road cars.

Doubters point out that not only have no new sponsors obviously been attracted, but that VW has since decided not to enter F1 for the foreseeable future.

As a result, the critics say, all the new rules will do is increase the cost for the existing participants. That is a major concern at a time when, according to one team boss, "there are a few teams on the breadline".

Equally, it seems that, among the current engine manufacturers, not only Ferrari is getting cold feet.

Mercedes would prefer not to change the rules; it is concerned about the expense and questions whether it is necessary, although I understand it has told fellow stakeholders it will go along with what everyone else agrees. Independent Cosworth is said to be not that keen either, although it told BBC Sport it was "neutral" and dismissed suggestions that it could not afford to build the engines. Only Renault will publicly say it is in favour.

The environmental argument is getting a bit of kicking, too.

The emissions created by an entire season of F1 races are less than those produced by one Boeing 747 flying to Japan. Road car manufacturers are already developing these engines. So why, some say, is F1 bothering? F1, the argument goes, should be about escapism, and the sport should be focusing on delivering more races like the recent thrilling Chinese Grand Prix.

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. Visit BBC Webwise for full instructions. If you're reading via RSS, you'll need to visit the blog to access this content.


So why not abandon or postpone the plan? Well, it is not as simple as that.

Renault's backing is rooted in marketing - it does not, unlike Mercedes and Ferrari, run its own F1 team and, unlike Cosworth, racing engines are not its core business.

Renault's F1 managing director Jean-Francois Caubet says the fact the sport is changing to a new more sustainable engine formula is one of three reasons for staying involved.

"The proposed rules are road-relevant and completely in line with Renault's road car strategy," he says. "We have already started design concepts on the 2013 engine, as this dovetails with our plans in road cars."

The French company plans for such engines - let's call them small capacity turbo-hybrid - to make up at least 70% of its road-car portfolio by 2015. It accepts the new F1 rules will cost money, but believes that is a price worth paying.

Caubet says Renault's presence in F1 is not "dependent on any future engine regulations", but does add the company is "very supportive of any regulations that make F1 more relevant to the overall aims of the Renault group".

Equally, proponents of the new engines point out that it is unfair to say no new manufacturers or sponsors have come in as a result of the new rules.

The change is still two years away, so how is it possible to know whether new sponsors will be attracted?

And just because no new car manufacturers have entered yet does not mean they will not. VW got cold feet, it is believed, because F1 took so long to agree the rules. Either way, the only sure thing is that new companies will not enter F1 if the engine rules stay the same.

As for Ecclestone, cynics in F1 - and there are many - believe his objections are at least as much about a couple of other issues he has not mentioned publicly.

One is that he and Todt simply do not get along. As someone who knows Ecclestone well said: "He's against it because Todt is for it."

FIA president Jean Todt and F1 commercial boss Bernie Ecclestone

Todt and Ecclestone do not see eye to eye on the new rules. Photo: Getty

There is also the fact that the sport's stakeholders are embarking on what will be tough and protracted negotiations aimed at extending the Concorde Agreement, the document that binds together the teams, the FIA and the commercial rights holders.

Ecclestone - representing the commercial rights holders, CVC - knows that both the teams and the FIA are unhappy with their financial arrangements and are asking for an improvement.

The teams are a potentially major headache for him. Currently, they get 47% of F1's revenues divided between them - and they are angling for as much as 80%. The teams are united under the umbrella group Fota, and have resisted all attempts to break them up over the last few years. Some believe Ecclestone sees the argument over engines as a chance to annex Ferrari and split Fota.

Of Ecclestone's public concerns, the least plausible is over the sound of the engines.

F1 used 1.5-litre turbo engines - and a formula restricting fuel usage, which is also part of the new rules - in the mid-1980s. Far from driving fans away, this is looked back on as one of the most exciting eras in the sport's history.

Insiders point out that only a handful of die-hard aficionados care about the sound of the engines - and that these people will watch anyway. The wider TV audience - which is of far more critical importance to the financial health of the sport - would probably not even notice the difference.

Equally, even if the sound of the engines is a concern, this can be addressed at least to some degree by tuning the exhaust.

As for affordability, the argument that the smaller teams will not be able to afford the new engines is easy to resolve - the manufacturers simply have to agree not to pass on the cost of development, and to keep the sale price of the engines the same as it is now.

In such situations, F1 usually finds a compromise - although that would mean Todt being seen to publicly back down, which is far from an easy sell when this is the first big change in F1 rules under his presidency.

But what would the compromise be?

An influential figure has recently proposed that the new rules could be postponed for a year until 2014. This would coincide with the fact that Pirelli's contract as tyre supplier runs out at the end of 2013 and allow the planned change of wheel-rim diameter from 13 to 15 inches to coincide with the new chassis rules, on which the wheel change has a significant impact.

Perhaps the current engines could be retained but with their Kers systems increased in power, and used to promote efficiency - such as running the cars purely on electric power in the pit lane. Perhaps a fuel restriction - part of the new rules anyway - could be introduced but not the new engines. Or a combination of some or all of the above.

The problem is that while all these arguments are going on, 2013 is getting ever closer, and engines have a long lead time. Manufacturers have already started work on the new designs, because that's what the rules say will be required.

Insiders say that, realistically, any decision will have to be made by the end of the summer. Any longer than that, and any objections will be academic - enough money will have been spent on the new engines that they might as well be adopted.

So if Ecclestone and Ferrari are going to spike the 2013 engine rules, they are going to have to get on with it.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/andrewbenson/2011/04/power_play_over_new_f1_rules.html

Piero Carini Duane Carter Eugenio Castellotti Johnny Cecotto Andrea de Cesaris Francois Cevert

Cheaper U.S. Passat price announced - but don't try importing to Europe

Volkswagen prices U.S.-market Passat $7,000 cheaper than previous model, much less than Europe's smaller Passat but import costs can be overwhelming.

Source: http://feeds.worldcarfans.com/~r/worldcarfans/Jxfz/~3/slfUbYKoEv4/cheaper-us-passat-price-announced---but-dont-try-importing

Chris Bristow Peter Broeker Tony Brooks Alan Brown Walt Brown Warwick Brown

Cheaper U.S. Passat price announced - but don't try importing to Europe

Volkswagen prices U.S.-market Passat $7,000 cheaper than previous model, much less than Europe's smaller Passat but import costs can be overwhelming.

Source: http://feeds.worldcarfans.com/~r/worldcarfans/Jxfz/~3/slfUbYKoEv4/cheaper-us-passat-price-announced---but-dont-try-importing

Ronnie Bucknum Ivor Bueb Sebastien Buemi Luiz Bueno Ian Burgess Luciano Burti

Audi promotes racing efforts with new 3D video

With the 24 hours of Le Mans just around the corner, Audi has released a new video which gives us a glimpse of A Day in the Life of an Audi Driver.

Source: http://feeds.worldcarfans.com/~r/worldcarfans/Jxfz/~3/o6F-4HvoBao/audi-promotes-racing-efforts-with-new-3d-video

Chris Craft Jim Crawford Ray Crawford Alberto Crespo Antonio Creus Larry Crockett

Campaign launched to save Team Lotus


© Save Team Lotus
One side of the Lotus naming dispute has been put forward on a new and in-depth webpage called www.saveteamlotus.com. The basic background is that the Lotus Racing F1 team had its naming rights revoked for next season by Group Lotus and, in order to keep racing under the Lotus name, bought the Team Lotus brand off David Hunt, who had owned it since the original team?s last race in 1994. Group Lotus has now taken Lotus Racing to court to try and stop it using the historic name in Formula One next year. The issue has been a source of constant confusion for many fans and the new webpage offers a breakdown of David Hunt?s and Team Lotus? side of the argument.

Source: http://blogs.espnf1.com/paperroundf1/archives/2010/11/campaign_launched_to_save_team_1.php

Christian Danner Jorge Daponte Anthony Davidson Jimmy Davies Colin Davis Jimmy Daywalt

Sunday, 29 May 2011

Vettel's KERS for concern

Source: http://www.metrof1.com/blogs/metrof1/2011/04/vettels-kers-for-concern.html

Louis Chiron Joie Chitwood Bob Christie Johnny Claes David Clapham Jim Clark†

Bahrain F1: Live Race Results and Positions after 1st Lap

Sebastian Vettel has started from the Pole Position at the Bahrain F1 Grand Prix but its the Ferrari of Filepe Massa which has taken the lead.
Here are the standings after the 1st lap at Bahrain F1 Grand Prix:
1 VETTEL ? Red Bull
2 ALONSO ? Ferrari
3 MASSA ? Ferrari
4 ROSBERG ? Mercedes
5 HAMILTON ? McLaren
6 [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/formula-f1/~3/RBJWIX-d9BU/

Gerhard Berger Eric Bernard Enrique Bernoldi Enrico Bertaggia Tony Bettenhausen Mike Beuttler

Jaguar SUV gets detailed - rumors

According to a recent report, the Jaguar crossover will feature an aluminum body and a variety of fuel-efficient engines.

Source: http://feeds.worldcarfans.com/~r/worldcarfans/Jxfz/~3/QbPwHiRHBRg/jaguar-suv-gets-detailed---rumors

Giancarlo Baghetti Julian Bailey Mauro Baldi Bobby Ball Marcel Balsa Lorenzo Bandini

Bernie looking at December 11 for Indian GP

A couple of weeks ago after a tip from a good source I suggested that the Indian GP might end up on December 11, and Ferrari boss Stefano Domenicali confirmed today that Bernie Ecclestone has indeed proposed the date. Bernie … Continue reading

Source: http://adamcooperf1.com/2011/05/27/4114/

Ian Ashley Gerry Ashmore Bill Aston Richard Attwood Manny Ayulo Luca Badoer

Ferrari F150th Italia is now Ferrari 150� Italia..!

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/F1InsightAFormula1Blog/~3/kmIq_iAPrzE/ferrari-f150th-italia-is-now-ferrari.html

George Abecassis Kenny Acheson Andrea de Adamich Philippe Adams Walt Ader Kurt Adolff

Ferrari Launch Their 2011 Car The F150

Ferrari have become the first team to launch their 2011 Formula One car – named the F150. Thw F150 name comes from the fact it is 150 years since Italian unification, the flag bearer for the nation decided it was important to increase exposure of the major event in the country’s long history. �The cars [...]

Source: http://f1fanatics.wordpress.com/2011/01/31/ferrari-launch-their-2011-car-the-f150/

Alberto Colombo Erik Comas Franco Comotti George Connor George Constantine John Cordts

Dacia Duster No Limit rally car officially unveiled

Following a preview earlier this month, Dacia has officially unveiled the Duster No Limit rally car. It will compete in the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb and features a tuned Nissan GT-R engine

Source: http://feeds.worldcarfans.com/~r/worldcarfans/Jxfz/~3/6t9elz2xhAY/dacia-duster-no-limit-rally-car-officially-unveiled

Jimmy Davies Colin Davis Jimmy Daywalt JeanDenis Deletraz Patrick Depailler Pedro Diniz

INDYCAR: Have You Bought A Ride Lately?

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/nofenders/zbjv/~3/UT64EAZlf7A/indycar-have-you-bought-ride-lately.html

Bobby Ball Marcel Balsa Lorenzo Bandini Henry Banks Fabrizio Barbazza John Barber

Herky Jerky Shuffle?

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/nofenders/zbjv/~3/4k2JuFURe_k/herky-jerky-shuffle.html

Philippe Alliot Cliff Allison Fernando Alonso Giovanna Amati George Amick Red Amick

Audi promotes racing efforts with new 3D video

With the 24 hours of Le Mans just around the corner, Audi has released a new video which gives us a glimpse of A Day in the Life of an Audi Driver.

Source: http://feeds.worldcarfans.com/~r/worldcarfans/Jxfz/~3/o6F-4HvoBao/audi-promotes-racing-efforts-with-new-3d-video

Derek Bell Stefan Bellof Paul Belmondo Tom Belso JeanPierre Beltoise Olivier Beretta